January was the hottest month on record

02.15.07

January 2007's global average temperature was the highest on record, setting a record high for two months in a row.

NHK

The global average temperature in January 2007 was 0.45 degrees Celsius higher than the 30-year average from 1971 through 2000. The average temperature in January was the highest since such records were first kept in 1891.

January's global average temperature was the highest on record, setting a record high for two months in a row.

Japan's Meteorological Agency said on Friday that the global average temperature in January was 0.45 degrees Celsius higher than the 30-year average from 1971 through 2000. The agency says the average temperature in January was the highest since such records were first kept in 1891.

It was particularly warm in Russia and some places in Europe. In Yakutsk in Siberia, it was more than 9 degrees higher than the 30-year average, and in Moscow and Berlin, it was over 5 degrees higher.

The agency attributes the higher temperatures to global warming as well as to the fact that the cold air mass in the arctic was kept from moving south.

The agency says the phenomenon of El Nino, which is partly to blame for Japan's unusually mild winter this year, is likely to end this spring. It said this is because the temperature of sea water near the equator in the eastern Pacific, which is the cause of the phenomenon, peaked in December and has since begun declining.

Prime Minister Abe's special advisor, Ms. Yuriko Koike, visited Washington for five days to attend a conference on global warming. Lawmakers from the United States and Europe hosted the Legislators Forum on Climate Change and Energy Security in the US capital on 2/13-14, 2007.

Ms. Koike, who is a former environment minister, will explain how Japan has been cutting its emissions of so-called greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide, that have being blamed for global warming. Ms. Koike is also expected to stress the need for cooperation among advanced and developing nations in stopping global warming.

Editor's note: The extreme cold temperatures experienced by much of the U.S. in February, 2007, do not in themselves have any significance to the trend line that records the heightening of global temperatures. Global warming is expected to be associated with more extremes, both hot and cold, around the steadily rising trend line of global temperatures.

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